Lateral Knee Subluxation

Internal knee pain and the regular sensation of your knee "giving away" is a sign of patellar subluxation. 

Internal knee pain and the regular sensation of your knee "giving away" is a sign of patellar subluxation. 

Ever been out on the field or in the middle of exercise when your knee gave out? Lateral Patellar Subluxation is one of the most common causes of ligament injury in athletes. Often caused by laxity in the ligaments or a great force while twisting, proper muscular balance in the thigh is crucial to prevention.

Notice what happens when the knee subluxes. The knee cap, or patellar, shifts laterally to the outer aspect of the joint, putting an immense amount of pressure on the ligaments that hold it in place.  

Notice what happens when the knee subluxes. The knee cap, or patellar, shifts laterally to the outer aspect of the joint, putting an immense amount of pressure on the ligaments that hold it in place.  

If you don't have the proper muscular balance, your knee can displace or dislocate entirely causing the ligaments that hold it all together to micro tear or snap.

One of the ways you can help prevent further injury when you have hyper laxity, is by purchasing a stabilizing brace. A cho-pat strap is a external device that stabilizes the lateral movement of the knee cap and allows for exercise without risk of further injury.  

One of the ways you can help prevent further injury when you have hyper laxity, is by purchasing a stabilizing brace. A cho-pat strap is a external device that stabilizes the lateral movement of the knee cap and allows for exercise without risk of further injury.  

Fortunately, if the ligament is not completely torn, it can be repaired without surgery. This requires an intervention  of rest, ice and elevation, which can be followed by isometric exercise and then redevelopment of the appropriate musculature.  

If you didn't tear any ligaments during displacement, after phase 3 isometric exercise, you can progress to more strenuous moves that will further develop the muscles needed to keep your knee strong. There are great exercises out there that can redevelop the adductor, vastus medialis and the gluteal medialis--all of which function together to create the perfect combination of strength to stabilize your knee. Here are my 3 favorite moves that will engage and strengthen the appropriate muscles without risk of injury: 

These exercises are only meant for post rehab. Do not attempt without the guidance of a physical therapist or fitness professional.  

These exercises are only meant for post rehab. Do not attempt without the guidance of a physical therapist or fitness professional.